California virus aid plan reportedly paying millions of $ 600 each

Millions of low-income Californians are reportedly receiving checks for $ 600 under a $ 9.6 billion coronavirus assistance program announced by Governor Gavin Newsom and legislative leaders. The plan announced on Wednesday would reduce checks to an estimated 5.7 million people who earn less than $ 30,000 a year, as well as some immigrants living illegally in the country who were excluded from federal COVID-19 relief payments made during the Trump administration. The plan also includes a new round of small business subsidies and more housing assistance for farm workers infected with the virus. The plan “will help those who suffer the most,” Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon said in a joint statement. “We are building an economic base for the recovery of jobs, small businesses and, indeed, our daily lives.” The lawmaker plans to resume the measure quickly, with votes expected as early as Monday after the budget committee hearings starting Thursday. Lawmakers are hoping that the money for some of the larger segments of the plan can be distributed in April. The plan calls for more money than Newsom proposed in its state budget last month, in part due to state revenues which have increased by more than $ 10 billion. provided that. About 5.7 million low-income residents would be eligible for one-time payments. Those receiving $ 600 include households that received an income tax credit in California in 2020. This brings the aid program’s highest price tag, to $ 2.3 billion. Immigrants and others who do not have a social security number but have an individual tax number, income less than $ 75,000 and were not eligible for recent federal payments would get $ 600 – increased to $ 1,200 whether they also qualify for the California earned income tax credit. The plan also expands Newsom’s original plan by providing payments to certain people who receive additional income under various state and federal programs, including immigrants and those aged 65 or older, blind or disabled. The timing of these payments is being worked out with federal officials. For small businesses affected by the pandemic, the package quadruples to over $ 2 billion available for grants of up to $ 25,000. Newsom last month recommended adding $ 500 million to the program, but state lawmakers believed that figure was too small. More than half of the 120 members of the Legislative Assembly have signed a proposal to allocate $ 2.6 billion of California’s unanticipated income to one-time grants for small businesses and nonprofits. Also under the new plan, more than 750,000 small businesses could deduct up to $ 150,000 from their state taxes in loans they received under the Paycheck Protection Plan. The same cap would also apply to businesses that received economic disaster loans, amounting to a total of $ 2 billion in tax cuts. Approximately 59,000 restaurants and bars would separately benefit from two years of annual license fee waivers ranging from $ 455 to $ 1,235. More than 600,000 individuals and businesses in barbers and cosmetology will also be able to retain their usual license rights for two years. “People are hungry and suffering, and the businesses that our communities have loved for decades are at risk of shutting down,” Senate pro Tempore Toni Atkins said in welcoming the agreement. Additional funds will also be allocated for state-subsidized day care centers and preschools. providers who collectively serve approximately 400,000 children, as well as low-income students in the systems of the University of California, California State University, and California Community College. Finally, an additional $ 24 million would be provided for a program that puts agricultural and food processing workers in hotels if they contract the virus and have nowhere to self-isolate, Newsom said on Wednesday as ‘he was speaking at a community vaccination clinic in the Coachella Valley, an area that is home to many farm laborers. The governor’s visit to the Coachella Valley was his final stop on a tour of the state to highlight vaccination efforts as the virus count in California continues to improve. The state’s test positivity rate, hospitalizations and deaths are all down, and the rate of people passing the virus on to others is now at its lowest in months. California has now administered more than 6 million vaccines, but the rollout has been slow and rocky and demand continues to far outstrip supply. The state is shifting to a new distribution system run by insurer Blue Shield, which will take some decision-making power away from counties. ___ Associate press reporter Amy Taxin in Orange County and Adam Beam in Sacramento have contributed .___ Californians can find out if they are eligible for the vaccine at https://myturn.ca.gov/ or by calling 1-833-422-4255.

Millions of low-income Californians are reportedly receiving checks for $ 600 under a $ 9.6 billion coronavirus assistance program announced by Governor Gavin Newsom and legislative leaders.

The plan announced on Wednesday would reduce checks to an estimated 5.7 million people who earn less than $ 30,000 a year, as well as some immigrants living illegally in the country who have been excluded from federal COVID-19 relief payments made during the Trump administration.

The plan also includes a new round of small business subsidies and more housing assistance for farm workers infected with the virus.

The plan “will help those who suffer the most,” Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon said in a joint statement. “We are building an economic base for the recovery of jobs, small businesses and, indeed, our daily lives.”

The Legislature plans to take action quickly, with votes expected as early as Monday after the budget committee hearings starting Thursday. Lawmakers are hoping that the money for some of the larger segments of the plan can be distributed in April.

The plan is asking for more money than Newsom proposed in its state budget last month, in part due to state revenues more than $ 10 billion above forecast.

About 5.7 million low-income residents would be eligible for one-time payments. Those receiving $ 600 include households that received an income tax credit in California in 2020. This represents the highest price in the relief plan, at $ 2.3 billion.

Immigrants and others who do not have a Social Security number but have an individual tax identification number, income less than $ 75,000 and who were not eligible for recent federal payments would receive $ 600 – raised to $ 1,200 if they also qualify for the California earned income tax credit.

The plan also expands Newsom’s original plan by providing payments to certain people who receive additional income under various state and federal programs, including immigrants and those aged 65 or older, blind or disabled.

The timing of these payments is being worked out with federal officials.

For small businesses affected by the pandemic, the package quadruples to over $ 2 billion available for grants of up to $ 25,000. Last month, Newsom recommended adding $ 500 million to the program, but state lawmakers believed that figure was too small.

More than half of the 120 members of the Legislative Assembly have signed a proposal to allocate $ 2.6 billion of California’s unanticipated income to one-time grants for small businesses and nonprofits.

Also under the new plan, more than 750,000 small businesses could deduct up to $ 150,000 from their state taxes in loans they received under the Paycheck Protection Plan. The same cap would also apply to businesses that received economic disaster loans, amounting to a total of $ 2 billion in tax cuts.

About 59,000 restaurants and bars would separately get two years of waived annual license fees ranging from $ 455 to $ 1,235. More than 600,000 individuals and businesses in barbers and cosmetology will also be able to retain their usual license rights for two years.

“People are hungry and suffering, and the businesses that our communities have loved for decades are at risk of shutting down,” Senate pro Tempore Toni Atkins said in welcoming the agreement.

Additional funds will also be allocated to state-subsidized child care and preschools that collectively serve approximately 400,000 children, as well as low-income students in the systems at the University of California, USA. California State University and California Community College.

Finally, an additional $ 24 million would be provided for a program that puts agricultural and food processing workers in hotels if they contract the virus and have no place to self-isolate, Newsom said on Wednesday as he was speaking at a community vaccination clinic in the Coachella Valley, an area home to many farm laborers.

The governor’s visit to the Coachella Valley was his final stop on a tour of the state to highlight vaccination efforts as the virus count in California continues to improve. The state’s test positivity rate, hospitalizations and deaths are all down, and the rate of people passing the virus to others is now at its lowest in months.

California has now administered more than 6 million vaccines, but rollout has been slow and difficult and demand continues to far outstrip supply. The state is shifting to a new distribution system run by insurer Blue Shield, which will take some decision-making power away from counties.

___

Associated Press reporter Amy Taxin in Orange County and Adam Beam in Sacramento contributed.

___

Californians can find out if they are eligible for the vaccine at https://myturn.ca.gov/ or by calling 1-833-422-4255.

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